Source code for plumbum.commands.modifiers

import os
from select import select
from subprocess import PIPE
import sys
import time
from itertools import chain

from plumbum.commands.processes import run_proc, ProcessExecutionError
from plumbum.commands.processes import BY_TYPE
import plumbum.commands.base
from plumbum.lib import read_fd_decode_safely


[docs]class Future(object): """Represents a "future result" of a running process. It basically wraps a ``Popen`` object and the expected exit code, and provides poll(), wait(), returncode, stdout, and stderr. """
[docs] def __init__(self, proc, expected_retcode, timeout=None): self.proc = proc self._expected_retcode = expected_retcode self._timeout = timeout self._returncode = None self._stdout = None self._stderr = None
[docs] def __repr__(self): return "<Future %r (%s)>" % ( self.proc.argv, self._returncode if self.ready() else "running", )
[docs] def poll(self): """Polls the underlying process for termination; returns ``False`` if still running, or ``True`` if terminated""" if self.proc.poll() is not None: self.wait() return self._returncode is not None
ready = poll
[docs] def wait(self): """Waits for the process to terminate; will raise a :class:`plumbum.commands.ProcessExecutionError` in case of failure""" if self._returncode is not None: return self._returncode, self._stdout, self._stderr = run_proc( self.proc, self._expected_retcode, self._timeout)
@property def stdout(self): """The process' stdout; accessing this property will wait for the process to finish""" self.wait() return self._stdout @property def stderr(self): """The process' stderr; accessing this property will wait for the process to finish""" self.wait() return self._stderr @property def returncode(self): """The process' returncode; accessing this property will wait for the process to finish""" self.wait() return self._returncode
#=================================================================================================== # execution modifiers #=================================================================================================== class ExecutionModifier(object): __slots__ = ("__weakref__", ) def __repr__(self): """Automatically creates a representation for given subclass with slots. Ignore hidden properties.""" slots = {} for cls in self.__class__.__mro__: slots_list = getattr(cls, "__slots__", ()) if isinstance(slots_list, str): slots_list = (slots_list, ) for prop in slots_list: if prop[0] != '_': slots[prop] = getattr(self, prop) mystrs = ("{0} = {1}".format(name, slots[name]) for name in slots) return "{0}({1})".format(self.__class__.__name__, ", ".join(mystrs)) @classmethod def __call__(cls, *args, **kwargs): return cls(*args, **kwargs) class _BG(ExecutionModifier): """ An execution modifier that runs the given command in the background, returning a :class:`Future <plumbum.commands.Future>` object. In order to mimic shell syntax, it applies when you right-and it with a command. If you wish to expect a different return code (other than the normal success indicate by 0), use ``BG(retcode)``. Example:: future = sleep[5] & BG # a future expecting an exit code of 0 future = sleep[5] & BG(7) # a future expecting an exit code of 7 .. note:: When processes run in the **background** (either via ``popen`` or :class:`& BG <plumbum.commands.BG>`), their stdout/stderr pipes might fill up, causing them to hang. If you know a process produces output, be sure to consume it every once in a while, using a monitoring thread/reactor in the background. For more info, see `#48 <https://github.com/tomerfiliba/plumbum/issues/48>`_ """ __slots__ = ("retcode", "kargs", "timeout") def __init__(self, retcode=0, timeout=None, **kargs): self.retcode = retcode self.kargs = kargs self.timeout = timeout def __rand__(self, cmd): return Future( cmd.popen(**self.kargs), self.retcode, timeout=self.timeout) BG = _BG() class _FG(ExecutionModifier): """ An execution modifier that runs the given command in the foreground, passing it the current process' stdin, stdout and stderr. Useful for interactive programs that require a TTY. There is no return value. In order to mimic shell syntax, it applies when you right-and it with a command. If you wish to expect a different return code (other than the normal success indicate by 0), use ``FG(retcode)``. Example:: vim & FG # run vim in the foreground, expecting an exit code of 0 vim & FG(7) # run vim in the foreground, expecting an exit code of 7 """ __slots__ = ("retcode", "timeout") def __init__(self, retcode=0, timeout=None): self.retcode = retcode self.timeout = timeout def __rand__(self, cmd): cmd(retcode=self.retcode, stdin=None, stdout=None, stderr=None, timeout=self.timeout) FG = _FG() class _TEE(ExecutionModifier): """Run a command, dumping its stdout/stderr to the current process's stdout and stderr, but ALSO return them. Useful for interactive programs that expect a TTY but also have valuable output. Use as: ls["-l"] & TEE Returns a tuple of (return code, stdout, stderr), just like ``run()``. """ __slots__ = ("retcode", "buffered", "timeout") def __init__(self, retcode=0, buffered=True, timeout=None): """`retcode` is the return code to expect to mean "success". Set `buffered` to False to disable line-buffering the output, which may cause stdout and stderr to become more entangled than usual. """ self.retcode = retcode self.buffered = buffered self.timeout = timeout def __rand__(self, cmd): with cmd.bgrun( retcode=self.retcode, stdin=None, stdout=PIPE, stderr=PIPE, timeout=self.timeout) as p: outbuf = [] errbuf = [] out = p.stdout err = p.stderr buffers = {out: outbuf, err: errbuf} tee_to = {out: sys.stdout, err: sys.stderr} done = False while not done: # After the process exits, we have to do one more # round of reading in order to drain any data in the # pipe buffer. Thus, we check poll() here, # unconditionally enter the read loop, and only then # break out of the outer loop if the process has # exited. done = (p.poll() is not None) # We continue this loop until we've done a full # `select()` call without collecting any input. This # ensures that our final pass -- after process exit -- # actually drains the pipe buffers, even if it takes # multiple calls to read(). progress = True while progress: progress = False ready, _, _ = select((out, err), (), ()) for fd in ready: buf = buffers[fd] data, text = read_fd_decode_safely(fd, 4096) if not data: # eof continue progress = True # Python conveniently line-buffers stdout and stderr for # us, so all we need to do is write to them # This will automatically add up to three bytes if it cannot be decoded tee_to[fd].write(text) # And then "unbuffered" is just flushing after each write if not self.buffered: tee_to[fd].flush() buf.append(data) stdout = ''.join([x.decode('utf-8') for x in outbuf]) stderr = ''.join([x.decode('utf-8') for x in errbuf]) return p.returncode, stdout, stderr TEE = _TEE() class _TF(ExecutionModifier): """ An execution modifier that runs the given command, but returns True/False depending on the retcode. This returns True if the expected exit code is returned, and false if it is not. This is useful for checking true/false bash commands. If you wish to expect a different return code (other than the normal success indicate by 0), use ``TF(retcode)``. If you want to run the process in the forground, then use ``TF(FG=True)``. Example:: local['touch']['/root/test'] & TF * Returns False, since this cannot be touched local['touch']['/root/test'] & TF(1) # Returns True local['touch']['/root/test'] & TF(FG=True) * Returns False, will show error message """ __slots__ = ("retcode", "FG", "timeout") def __init__(self, retcode=0, FG=False, timeout=None): """`retcode` is the return code to expect to mean "success". Set `FG` to True to run in the foreground. """ self.retcode = retcode self.FG = FG self.timeout = timeout @classmethod def __call__(cls, *args, **kwargs): return cls(*args, **kwargs) def __rand__(self, cmd): try: if self.FG: cmd(retcode=self.retcode, stdin=None, stdout=None, stderr=None, timeout=self.timeout) else: cmd(retcode=self.retcode, timeout=self.timeout) return True except ProcessExecutionError: return False TF = _TF() class _RETCODE(ExecutionModifier): """ An execution modifier that runs the given command, causing it to run and return the retcode. This is useful for working with bash commands that have important retcodes but not very useful output. If you want to run the process in the forground, then use ``RETCODE(FG=True)``. Example:: local['touch']['/root/test'] & RETCODE # Returns 1, since this cannot be touched local['touch']['/root/test'] & RETCODE(FG=True) * Returns 1, will show error message """ __slots__ = ("foreground", "timeout") def __init__(self, FG=False, timeout=None): """`FG` to True to run in the foreground. """ self.foreground = FG self.timeout = timeout @classmethod def __call__(cls, *args, **kwargs): return cls(*args, **kwargs) def __rand__(self, cmd): if self.foreground: return cmd.run( retcode=None, stdin=None, stdout=None, stderr=None, timeout=self.timeout)[0] else: return cmd.run(retcode=None, timeout=self.timeout)[0] RETCODE = _RETCODE() class _NOHUP(ExecutionModifier): """ An execution modifier that runs the given command in the background, disconnected from the current process, returning a standard popen object. It will keep running even if you close the current process. In order to slightly mimic shell syntax, it applies when you right-and it with a command. If you wish to use a diffent working directory or different stdout, stderr, you can use named arguments. The default is ``NOHUP( cwd=local.cwd, stdout='nohup.out', stderr=None)``. If stderr is None, stderr will be sent to stdout. Use ``os.devnull`` for null output. Will respect redirected output. Example:: sleep[5] & NOHUP # Outputs to nohup.out sleep[5] & NOHUP(stdout=os.devnull) # No output The equivelent bash command would be .. code-block:: bash nohup sleep 5 & """ __slots__ = ('cwd', 'stdout', 'stderr', 'append') def __init__(self, cwd='.', stdout='nohup.out', stderr=None, append=True): """ Set ``cwd``, ``stdout``, or ``stderr``. Runs as a forked process. You can set ``append=False``, too. """ self.cwd = cwd self.stdout = stdout self.stderr = stderr self.append = append def __rand__(self, cmd): if isinstance(cmd, plumbum.commands.base.StdoutRedirection): stdout = cmd.file append = False cmd = cmd.cmd elif isinstance(cmd, plumbum.commands.base.AppendingStdoutRedirection): stdout = cmd.file append = True cmd = cmd.cmd else: stdout = self.stdout append = self.append return cmd.nohup(self.cwd, stdout, self.stderr, append) NOHUP = _NOHUP()
[docs]class PipeToLoggerMixin(): """ This mixin allows piping plumbum commands' output into a logger. The logger must implement a ``log(level, msg)`` method, as in ``logging.Logger`` Example:: class MyLogger(logging.Logger, PipeToLoggerMixin): pass logger = MyLogger("example.app") Here we send the output of an install.sh script into our log:: local['./install.sh'] & logger We can choose the log-level for each stream:: local['./install.sh'] & logger.pipe(out_level=logging.DEBUG, err_level=logging.DEBUG) Or use a convenience method for it:: local['./install.sh'] & logger.pipe_debug() A prefix can be added to each line:: local['./install.sh'] & logger.pipe(prefix="install.sh: ") If the command fails, an exception is raised as usual. This can be modified:: local['install.sh'] & logger.pipe_debug(retcode=None) An exception is also raised if too much time (``DEFAULT_LINE_TIMEOUT``) passed between lines in the stream, This can also be modified:: local['install.sh'] & logger.pipe(line_timeout=10) If we happen to use logbook:: class MyLogger(logbook.Logger, PipeToLoggerMixin): from logbook import DEBUG, INFO # hook up with logbook's levels """ from logging import DEBUG, INFO DEFAULT_LINE_TIMEOUT = 10 * 60 DEFAULT_STDOUT = "INFO" DEFAULT_STDERR = "DEBUG"
[docs] def pipe(self, out_level=None, err_level=None, prefix=None, line_timeout=None, **kw): """ Pipe a command's stdout and stderr lines into this logger. :param out_level: the log level for lines coming from stdout :param err_level: the log level for lines coming from stderr Optionally use `prefix` for each line. """ class LogPipe(object): def __rand__(_, cmd): popen = cmd if hasattr(cmd, "iter_lines") else cmd.popen() for typ, lines in popen.iter_lines(line_timeout=line_timeout, mode=BY_TYPE, **kw): if not lines: continue level = levels[typ] for line in lines.splitlines(): if prefix: line = "%s: %s" % (prefix, line) self.log(level, line) return popen.returncode levels = {1: getattr(self, self.DEFAULT_STDOUT), 2: getattr(self, self.DEFAULT_STDERR)} if line_timeout is None: line_timeout = self.DEFAULT_LINE_TIMEOUT if out_level is not None: levels[1] = out_level if err_level is not None: levels[2] = err_level return LogPipe()
[docs] def pipe_info(self, prefix=None, **kw): """ Pipe a command's stdout and stderr lines into this logger (both at level INFO) """ return self.pipe(self.INFO, self.INFO, prefix=prefix, **kw)
[docs] def pipe_debug(self, prefix=None, **kw): """ Pipe a command's stdout and stderr lines into this logger (both at level DEBUG) """ return self.pipe(self.DEBUG, self.DEBUG, prefix=prefix, **kw)
[docs] def __rand__(self, cmd): """ Pipe a command's stdout and stderr lines into this logger. Log levels for each stream are determined by ``DEFAULT_STDOUT`` and ``DEFAULT_STDERR``. """ return cmd & self.pipe(getattr(self, self.DEFAULT_STDOUT), getattr(self, self.DEFAULT_STDERR))